JMIR Research Protocols

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) publishes peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches. (Preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research.) While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JMIR Research Protocols publishes research protocols, proposals, and methods in all areas of medical and health research.

    • JMIR Research Protocols publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine (and their peer-review reports, if available)

    • JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central

    • Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort

    • JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal

    • JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols

    • JMIR Res Protoc facilitates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced

    • JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a priori methods

    • In an effort to make research more reproducible and to avoid problems such as switched outcomes, many journals now require publication of research protocols (even for non-RCTs)

    • Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol, regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine

    • Published protocols will receive a Registered Report Identifier which will facilitate publication of the subsequent results paper; see What is a Registered Report?

    • Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others)

For more information on why to publish protocols or proposals see our Knowledge Base article Why should I publish my protocol or grant proposal?

Recent Articles

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

By 2025, 5 million Canadians will be diagnosed with diabetes, and women from lower socioeconomic groups will likely account for most new diagnoses. Diabetic retinopathy is a primary vision complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among adults, with 26% prevalence among women. Tele-retina is a branch of telemedicine that delivers eye care remotely. Screening for diabetic retinopathy has great potential to reduce the incidence of blindness, yet there is an adverse association among screening, income, and gender.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Because of the improvements in survival rates for preterm infants, not only the rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) but also those of long-term respiratory complications of premature birth are increasing, resulting in financial and health burdens in developed countries. Thus far, the risk factors of respiratory morbidities in extremely preterm infants remain unknown. Furthermore, the definition and the predictive ability of BPD for long-term respiratory outcomes are yet to be determined.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the world’s attention has been focused on better understanding the relation between the human host and the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as its action has led to hundreds of thousands of deaths.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, continues to impact health systems throughout the world with serious medical challenges being imposed on many African countries like Nigeria. Although emerging studies have identified lymphopenia as a driver of cytokine storm, disease progression, and poor outcomes in infected patients, its immunopathogenesis, as well as environmental and genetic determinants, remain unclear. Understanding the interplay of these determinants in the context of lymphopenia and COVID-19 complications in patients in Africa may help with risk stratification and appropriate deployment of targeted treatment regimens with repurposed drugs to improve prognosis.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Approximately 2.4 million children in the United States suffer from food-induced anaphylaxis, a condition that is annually responsible for over 200 deaths and 200,000 emergency room visits. As a result, caregivers of children newly diagnosed with severe and life-threatening food allergic reactions experience clinically significant symptoms of psychological distress, including fatigue, anxiety, depressed mood, social isolation, and substantially reduced quality of life. Despite this recognition, there is a lack of caregiver-centered self-management interventions to address these concerns.

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Non-randomized Protocols and Methods (ehealth)

Individuals can experience different manifestations of the same psychological disorder. This underscores the need for a personalized model approach in the study of psychopathology. Emerging adulthood is a developmental phase wherein individuals are especially vulnerable to psychopathology. Given their exposure to repeated stressors and disruptions in routine, the emerging adult population is worthy of investigation.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) adults in the United States experience health disparities, especially in HIV infection. Medical gender affirmation (eg, hormone therapy and gender-affirming surgeries) is known to be medically necessary and to improve some health conditions. To our knowledge, however, no studies have assessed the effects of gender-affirming medical care on HIV-related outcomes.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, eHealth)

This paper describes the research protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a multimodal mobile sleep intervention for heavy-drinking young adults. Young adults report the highest rates of heavy, risky alcohol consumption and are a priority population for alcohol prevention and intervention efforts. Alcohol strategies that leverage other health concerns and use technology may offer an innovative solution. Poor sleep is common among young adults and is a risk factor for developing an alcohol use disorder. Moreover, young adults are interested in information to help them sleep better, and behavioral sleep interventions address alcohol use as a standard practice.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Young-onset colorectal cancer is a contemporary issue in need of substantial research input. The incidence of colorectal cancer in adults younger than 50 years is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of this cancer in older adults. People with young-onset colorectal cancer may be at that stage of life in which they are establishing their careers, building relationships with long-term partners, raising children, and assembling a financial base for the future. A qualitative study designed to facilitate triangulation with extant quantitative patient-reported data would contribute the first comprehensive resource for understanding how this distinct patient population experiences health services and the outcomes of care throughout the patient pathway.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) is a frequent medical emergency. GCSE treatment focuses on the administration of benzodiazepines followed by a second-line antiepileptic drug (AED). Despite this stepwise strategy, GCSE is not controlled in one-quarter of patients and is associated with protracted hospitalization, high mortality, and long-term disability. Valproic acid (VPA) is an AED with good tolerability and neuroprotective properties.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

A stepped-down program is one in which clients transition from the care of a health professional to self-managed care. Very little is known about the effectiveness of stepped-down physical activity (PA) programs for military service veterans.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

In Australia, secondary school educators are well positioned to recognize mental illness among students and provide support. However, many report that they lack the knowledge and confidence to do so, and few mental health training programs available for educators are evidence based. To address this gap, the Black Dog Institute (BDI) developed a web-based training program (Building Educators’ Skills in Adolescent Mental Health [BEAM]) that aims to improve mental health knowledge, confidence, and helping behaviors among secondary school educators in leadership positions. A pilot study of the training program found it to be positively associated with increased confidence and helping behaviors among educators and reduced personal psychological distress. An adequately powered randomized controlled trial (RCT) is needed.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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