JMIR Research Protocols

Ongoing trials, grant proposals, and methods.

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


Impact Factor 2023

 

JMIR Research Protocols (ISSN 1929-0748) is a unique Pubmed- and (new!) Scopus-indexed journal, publishing peer-reviewed, openly accessible research ideas and grant proposals, study and trial protocols, reports of ongoing research, current methods and approaches, and preliminary results from pilot studies or formative research informing the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations.

While the original focus was on eHealth studies, JMIR Res Protoc now publishes protocols and grant proposals in all areas of medicine, and their peer-review reports, if available (preliminary results from pilot studies, early results, and formative research should now be published in JMIR Formative Research).

While the original focus was on the design of medical and health-related research and technology innovations, JRP publishes research protocols, proposals, feasibility studies, methods and early results in all areas of medical and health research.

JMIR Res Protoc is fully open access, with full-text articles deposited in PubMed Central.

Publishing research protocols, grant proposals, pilot/feasibility studies and early reports of ongoing and planned work encourages collaboration and early feedback, and reduces duplication of effort.

JMIR Res Protoc is compatible with the concept of "Registered Reports" and since May 2018, published protocols receive a Registered Report Identifier (What is a Registered Report Identifier?) and acceptance of the subsequent results paper is "in principle" guaranteed in any JMIR journal and partner journals - see What is a Registered Report?

JMIR Res Protoc will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to learn about current research methodologies and how to write a winning grant proposal.

JMIR Res Protoc creates an early scientific record for researchers who have developed novel methodologies, software, innovations or elaborate protocols.

JMIR Res Protoc provides a "dry-run" for peer-review of the final results paper, and allows feedback/critique of the methods, often while they still can be fixed.

JMIR Res Protoc faciliates subsequent publication of results demonstrating that the methodology has already been reviewed, and reduces the effort of writing up the results, as the protocol can be easily referenced.

JMIR Res Protoc demonstrates to reviewers of subsequent results papers that authors followed and adhered to carefully developed and described a-priori methods.

Studies whose protocols or grant proposals have been accepted in JMIR Res Protoc are "in principle accepted" for subsequent publication of results in other JMIR journals as long as authors adhere to their original protocol - regardless of study results (even if they are negative), reducing publication bias in medicine.

Authors publishing their protocols in JMIR Res Protoc will receive a 20% discount on the article processing fee if they publish their results in another journal of the JMIR journal family (for example, JMIR for ehealth studies, i-JMR for others).

JMIR Res Protoc is also a unique crowdfunding platform, allowing backers to crowdfund carefully peer-reviewed projects that are not junk-science, and giving researchers additional small funding to conduct and publish their research results. Each article is published with a crowdfunding widget, allowing readers to make nominal donations to the project, which benefit the authors (currently in beta).

Need more reasons? Read the Knowledge Base article on "Why should I publish my protocol/grant proposal"!

 

Recent Articles

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders during childhood; however, the diagnosis procedure remains challenging, as it is nonstandardized, multiparametric, and highly dependent on subjective evaluation of the perceived behavior.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Neuropathic pain (NP), a complication of several conditions (eg, diabetic neuropathy and varicella zoster), is a common challenging problem, and there is a growing need to develop safe and effective nonopioid treatments. Sleep disturbance is commonly associated with NP because pain intensity in NP conditions is often worse at night. The pineal hormone melatonin has been shown to reduce pain in both preclinical and clinical settings, in addition to multiple trials demonstrating efficacy for primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Implementing community health nursing programs is a new field of application in the primary health sector of Germany. Hence, there is limited evidence of effective community-based and nurse-led interventions with regard to the German health care system. International research findings are mostly not transferable. The Community Health Nursing in der Stadt (CoSta; ie, “Community Health Nursing in the City”) project is the first study that examines a community health nurse–led intervention for adults with chronic health conditions.

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Non-Randomized Study Protocols and Methods (Non-eHealth)

Excessive screen time is associated with poor health and behavioral outcomes in children. However, research on screen time use has been hindered by methodological limitations, including retrospective reports of usual screen time and lack of momentary etiologic processes occurring within each day.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Chronic neck pain (CNP) is prevalent, and it reduces functional status and quality of life and is associated with deleterious psychological outcomes in affected individuals. Despite the desirability of massage and its demonstrated effectiveness in CNP treatment, multiple accessibility barriers exist. Caregiver-applied massage has demonstrated feasibility in various populations but has not been examined in Veterans with CNP or compared in parallel to therapist-delivered massage.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Early childhood experiences such as trauma, exposure to violence, and poverty can significantly contribute to childhood anxiety, which is viewed as the most common mental health issue among children. In South Africa, there is no uniform tool to screen for anxiety during early childhood. This study aims to develop a tool to screen for anxiety in children aged 4 to 8 years, which could be utilized by preschool and foundation phase teachers to aid in the early identification of childhood anxiety.

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Non-Randomized Studies (funded, eHealth)

Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease are a major factor of disease burden but are often underreported in clinical appointments. A digital tool has been developed to support the monitoring and management of nonmotor symptoms.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

The COVID-19 pandemic has had drastic consequences on everyday life in nursing homes. Limited personnel resources and modified hygiene and safety measures (eg, no external exercise instructors, no group settings) have often led to interrupted physical exercise treatments. As a consequence, people with dementia benefiting from individualized exercise programs are affected by the pandemic’s impact.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (eHealth)

Sleep disturbances post concussion have been associated with more frequent and severe concussion symptoms and may contribute to poorer recovery. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an effective treatment for insomnia; however, it remains unclear if this treatment method is effective in improving sleep outcomes and reducing concomitant postconcussion symptoms.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (non-eHealth)

Seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) is a highly effective community-based intervention to prevent malaria infections in areas where the malaria burden is high and transmission occurs mainly during the rainy season. In Africa, so far, SMC has been implemented in the Sahel region. Mozambique contributes 4% of the global malaria cases, and malaria is responsible for one-quarter of all deaths in the country. Based on recommendations in the Malaria Strategic Plan, the Malaria Consortium, in partnership with the National Malaria Control Programme in Mozambique, initiated a phased SMC implementation study in the northern province of Nampula. The first phase of this 2-year implementation study was conducted in 2020-2021 and focused on the feasibility and acceptability of SMC. The second phase will focus on demonstrating impact. This paper describes phase 2 of the implementation study.

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RCTs - Protocols/Proposals (funded, already peer-reviewed, non-eHealth)

Chronic pain and access to care are identified as critical needs of the Veterans Health Administration. Music imagery and music listening interventions have shown promise as effective nonpharmacological options for pain management. However, most studies have focused on acute pain, passive music experiences, and in-person delivery.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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